Desi Viagra Price In India

Price competitive.
Effect:
Erection possible 30 minutes after taking the pill.
Side-effects:
Can be fatal for patients on medication with nitrates or for cardio-vascular patients.Temporary loss of colour vision, nausea and headache.

This consequently increases the supply and leads to erection. It isn’t as if the disorder doesn’t have optional cures, but no treatment matches the drug in the sheer simplicity of its administration. Which explains the euphoric reception to its arrival.

«We can now give oral tablets to the patients,» says Saxena, «and it will also stop them from going to the quacks.» For eminent Mumbai-based andrologist Vijay Kulkarni, «it’s one more tool for treating the patient».

Tempering the ebullience, however, are experts who sound a word of caution. Viagra is not, they emphasise, an aphrodisiac, as is widely assumed. The potential danger arising from its misuse is why it has been cleared only as a prescription drug.

Says DCGI Ashwini Kumar: «It has been approved on the condition that it be used cautiously under therapeutic conditions.» For the genuine patient though, the readily available, cheap, effective tablet is nothing but good news.

After Viagra’s four-year run in the market worldwide, the drug’s effectiveness is not disputed and is bound to have a big impact. But there’s a flipside. Sildenafil can be fatal for people on nitrates and those with cardio-vascular problems.

If taken with nitrates, it reduces the patients’ blood pressure dramatically. Possible temporary side-effects are headache and nausea. A more serious effect is loss of blue-green colour vision. The correct dose is, hence, of prime importance; all Indian versions of sildenafil will be available in 25 mg, 50 mg and 100 mg doses.

Misuse of sildenafil can also lead to tragicomic mishaps. Doctors cite numerous instances where normal people took Viagra to enhance their sexual performance. The result was an embarrassing and painfully prolonged erection that lasted for days and required surgery to rectify. Both doctors and manufacturers emphasise that sildenafil is a treatment, not a cure.

It temporarily acts on a specific part of the body but it does not solve the underlying reason for the disorder. «Sexual dysfunction is about more than just Viagra,» says Kulkarni, «Psycho-sexual counselling is very important.» All companies Torrent, Cadila and Ranbaxy emphasise the need for patients to be educated by urologists, endocrinologists and psychiatrists.

S.D. Kaul, Regional Director, Asia & Middle East, Ranbaxy

Side-effects notwithstanding, the pharmaceutical companies are upbeat. «We’re on top of the world,» exclaims a jubilant S.D. Kaul, regional director, Asia and Middle East, Ranbaxy. He has reason to be. With India’s billion-plus population, the sheer numbers translate to tremendous market potential. «The market would run to about Rs 50-100 crore. It’s a blockbuster drug,» says Kaul.

Other companies provide similar estimates. But with so many vying for a slice of the pie, a bit of shine may rub off soon. Stiff competition will define price and profit margins to the patient’s benefit. The approximate price of the new drug is Rs 20 per tablet, which is already a big gain for patients who are currently shelling out Rs 500 per tablet for the imported Viagra in the grey market.

The affordability of the genuine sildenafil brands could also adversely affect the popularity of the anti-impotence herbal drugs.

With the product being identical, marketing strategy will decide the winners and losers in the Great Indian Sildenafil Contest. Brand name, colour and even the shape of the tablets are being depicted as distinguishing features to gain an edge in the market.

As for Ranbaxy’s brand, Caverta, «the name derives from the cavernosa, the part of penis that plays a vital role in erection», explains Kaul. Torrent’s choice, Androz, derives from andrology a science that deals with the study of the masculine constitution, according to R. Balasubramanian, vice-president, marketing, Torrent.

Penegra was Cadila’s choice both because it refers to problems of penetration, and the penis, says President Ganesh Nayak. Blue and diamond shaped, the Penegra pill is an exact copy of Viagra. Ranbaxy’s red triangular tablets are deliberately designed to be different, while Torrent’s tablets are blue and round.

«We have made a conscious effort to retain the round shape like regular tablets to tell the patients that ED is neither fun nor serious. It’s just another curable condition,» says Balasubramanian.

An India-specific marketing challenge for the companies is people’s reluctance to talk openly about sexual matters. Says Kaul: «We don’t just have to create a brand but also a market, as ED is a hush-hush affair here.» Besides, impotence is not just any other disease like diabetes or malaria.

Striking at the very core of manhood, its impact finds an echo in every aspect of man’s life: the wife doomed to a celibate existence and the boss stuck with a depressed, less-productive employee. Small wonder then that the drug is seen as the best thing to happen to the Indian male in a long, long time.

Some of the optional cures available to erectile dysfunctional patients in India are:

  • The most popular and affordable treatment so far has been the papaverine injection. At Rs 15-20 per shot, it is the price, not convenience, that dictates its popularity. The drug has to be injected locally into the phallus, a painful procedure that can lead to infection unless done in aseptic conditions, according to Professor N.K. Mohanty, head of urology at Delhi’s Safdarjung Hospital.
  • The vacuum erection device is the only non-invasive treatment that has no side-effects, says Mohanty. There are no injections, no tablets — only a hollow tube that creates a vacuum and sucks blood into the penis, leading to an erection. At Rs 10,000- 20,000 one-time cost, the price at least induces a sense of satisfaction.
  • Some men — such as traumatic paraplegics — suffer from extreme impotence. A penile implant is then the only option. The device is designed to last a lifetime. But, insists Ajit Saxena, senior consultant urologist at Delhi’s Apollo Hospital, implants should be prescribed only after a thorough psychological assessment, when all else fails. This procedure involves placing an artificial implant into the phallus. The price can range from Rs 40,000 to Rs 2 lakh but the result is near-normal function. The biggest drawback is infection and rejection by the body, which occurs in about 2 to 3 per cent of the surgeries.

On this page we consider the theatre of ancient Greece, the history of theatre as it migrated from Greece to Rome, and the history of Medieval theatre following the fall of the Roman Empire, a theatre dominated by an unlikely combination of the Church and itinerant troupes of entertainers.

Greek Theatre

If theatre is to be defined as involving the art of acting a part on stage, that is the dramatic impersonation of another character than yourself, we begin with Thespis. A figure of whom we know very little, he won the play competition in honor of the greek god Dionysus, in 534 B.C. While it is uncertain whether Thespis was a playwright, an actor or a priest, it is his name with which the dramatic arts are associated in our word «Thespian».
Greek theatre took place in large (the largest ultimately held twenty thousand people) hillside ampitheatres. The players included a chorus and their leader, and the «lines» were more chanted than spoken. The chorus performed in the «orchestra», not on a raised stage. The use of masks to represent characters and high-soled boots worn to add height to the players limited the movement of the actors. Indeed, the concept of «actors» themselves was not originally a part of Greek theatre, but was developed as a consequence of certain playwrights of particular genius.
Greek drama was dominated by the works and innovations of five playwrights over the 200 years following Thespis. The first three of these were tragedians. Aeschylus (525-456 B.C.), who is most famous for his tragic trilogy the Oresteia. introduced the concept of a second actor, expanding the possibilities for plot and histrionics through the interaction of two characters in his dramas. While Aeschylus ultimately used a third actor, it was Sophocles (496-406 B.C.) who actually initiated this innovation. Sophocles is most famous for his trilogy Oedipus Rex. and in his works the role of the chorus in Greek drama diminishes in favor of the interplay between characters and the development of character itself. It was Euripides (480-406 B.C.), however, while winning less competitions than Aeschylus or Sophocles, who foreshadowed the ultimate form of drama as we know it — employing a far more naturalistic or human approach in his works, in contrast to the remote scale and formalized conventions used by his contemporaries.
The last two Greek playwrights were the authors of comedies: Aristophanes (448-380 B.C.) and Menander (342-292 B.C.). There was a separate competition for comedy which, while also dedicated to Dionysus, took place at the smaller winter festival, rather than the major spring festival at which the tragedies were presented. As has been true throughout the history of theatre, the comedies, dependent on topical humor and satire for much of their content, have not survived the ages as well as tragedy — which deals with more universal themes. However, the universal popularity accorded these playwrights during their lifetimes attests to the significance which this dramatic form can have. The popularity of their work, and the diminishing appeal of tragedy to the audiences of the time, can also be interpreted as a comment on the role which theatre plays in society at large. Tragedy was at its height in Greek society when that society was at its height, while comedy — an outlet for the frustrations of society as well as a diversion for the masses — was most popular during the decline of Greek government.

Roman Theatre

The decline of Greek government and society coincided with the rise of the Roman Republic and subsequent empire. The Romans borrowed extensively from Greek theatre. Although Roman theatre may not be held in the same high esteem as that of the Greeks, we have inherited much from the influence of the Roman Theatre, including the word «play» itself, which derives from a literal translation of the Latin word ludus. which means recreation or play. Roman theatre took two forms: Fabula Palliata and Fabula Togata. Fabula Palliata were primarily translations of Greek plays into Latin, although the term is also applied to the original works of Roman playwrights based upon Greek plays. We are familiar with the latter from the works of Terence (190-159 B.C.), who introduced the concept of a subplot, enabling us to contrast the reactions of different sets of characters to the same events or circumstances. The Fabula Togata were of native origin, and were based on more broadly farcical situations and humor of a physical nature. An author of some of the better examples of this type of drama is Plautus (c.250-184 B.C.).
Again, perhaps as a reflection of the society itself, performed drama in Rome consisted primarily of Fabula Togata. as well as the spectacles of the gladiators and chariot races made familiar by modern Hollywood treatment of the Roman Empire. Plays of a more serious literary nature continued to be written, but these were not intended to be performed so much as read or recited. Although we have few works by Roman playwrights surviving to us in forms that would lend themselves to revival, the influence of the Roman world on the form of the stage is one which had more lasting effect. The semi-circular orchestra of the Greek theatre came to be eclipsed by the raised stage and the more vigorous style style of acting employed by the performers. However, the greatest impact Rome may have had on the theatre was to lower it in the esteem of the Church — an impact that was to retard the growth of the dramatic arts for several centuries.
The bent toward low comedy and its mass appeal — coupled with its association with the entertainment of the arena (which involved the martyrdom of early Christians) — almost certainly contributed to its disfavor by officials of the early Christian Church. Plays, or ludii were associated with either comedy of a coarse and scurrilous nature, or with pagan rituals and holidays. It was the latter, however, which may account for the survival of theatre through the Middle Ages.

Medieval Theatre

Some have written that theatre died following the fall of the Roman Empire, and its memory was kept alive only in the performances of roving bands of jongleurs. itinerant street players, jugglers, acrobats and animal trainers. However, while such troupes did help to maintain certain aspects of theatrical art, particularly that involving stock characters, the Church itself contributed to the preservation of theatre.
It is ironic that the Church, which caused theatres to be outlawed as the Roman Empire declined and then fell, was one of the primary means of keeping theatre alive through the Middle Ages. This resulted from the Church’s need to establish itself in the community — a community still steeped in pagan ritual and superstition which manifested itself in seasonal festivals. The Church ultimately linked its own religious holidays with these seasonal festivals and began to use dramatic form to illustrate the stories underlying these holidays so as to reinforce their religious connotation and to better communicate the stories to an illiterate congregation.
At first the parts played in these simple religious re-enactments of the nativity and adoration of the Magi were played by priests in the sanctuary of the church. However, as the repertoire of the Church grew to include the passion and crucifixion of Christ, the Church was confronted with the dilemma of how a priest should portray Herod. While division of opinion in the Church continued as to the worth of dramatic interpretations, the members of the congregation clearly enjoyed and were moved by them. The dramas continued to grow, moving out of the sanctuary and into the open air in front of the Church. Ultimately, the members of town guilds began to contribute to these dramas, which continued to grow more elaborate with time. Known as passion plays, miracle plays and morality plays, they continued their close connection with the Church and church holidays, but began to introduce elements of stock characters that were more contemporary in nature. With the growth of towns and the introduction of stable governments in Europe, the stage was set for the Protestant Reformation, the Catholic Counter-Reformation and the secularization of theatre as it emerged from the influence of the Medieval Church.

The Natus Neurology product line offers a broad range of neurodiagnostic and monitoring solutions, including ICU, EP, EEG, EMG, TCD, IOM, Sleep, Long-term Monitoring, and Functional Brain Mapping, along with a comprehensive line of supplies and integrated connectivity solutions.

Natus Solutions for
Hospital Services: EEG, LTM,
ICU, IOM & PSG

US News & World Report
Top 20 Hospitals using
Natus EMG equipment

US News & World Report
Top 20 Hospitals using
Natus EEG equipment

Related Posts:

viagra mail order australia
prix generique viagra mylan
viagra venta libre en colombia
sildenafil citrate costco
viagra at cheap prices
viagra-cialis original kaufen
order viagra online europe
viagra for sale in canada
pfizer viagra online cheap
sildenafil venta en ecuador